Tuesday, 27 December 2011

What are Dental Implants?

Dental implants are metal posts or frames that are surgically positioned into the jawbone beneath your gums. Once in place, they allow your dentist to mount replacement teeth onto them.

How do Dental Implants Work?
Because implants fuse to your jawbone, they provide stable support for artificial teeth. Dentures and bridges mounted to implants won't slip or shift in your mouth — an especially important benefit when eating and speaking. This secure fit helps the dentures and bridges — as well as individual crowns placed over implants — feel more natural than conventional bridges or dentures.

For some people, ordinary bridges and dentures are simply not comfortable or even possible, due to sore spots, poor ridges or gagging. In addition, ordinary bridges must be attached to teeth on either side of the space left by the missing tooth. An advantage of implants is that no adjacent teeth need to be prepared or ground down to hold your new replacement tooth/teeth in place.


To receive implants, you need to have healthy gums and adequate bone to support the implant. You must also commit to keeping these structures healthy. Meticulous
oral hygiene and regular dental visits are critical to the long-term success of dental implants.

Implants are usually more expensive than other methods of tooth replacement, and most insurance carriers typically cover less than 10 percent of the fees.


The American Dental Association considers two types of implants to be safe. They are:
  • Endosteal implants — these are surgically implanted directly into the jawbone. Once the surrounding gum tissue has healed, a second surgery is needed to connect a post to the original implant. Finally, an artificial tooth (or teeth) is attached to the post-individually, or grouped on a bridge or denture.
  • Subperiosteal implants — these consist of a metal frame that is fitted onto the jawbone just below the gum tissue. As the gums heal, the frame becomes fixed to the jawbone. Posts, which are attached to the frame, protrude through the gums. As with endosteal implants, artificial teeth are then mounted to the posts.
How Long do Dental Implants Last?
Implants generally last 10-20 years, depending on the location of the implant and patient compliance with oral hygiene and dental visits. Because molars receive more stress and wear and tear, these implants typically do not last as long as implants located at the front of your mouth.
 

Above article from www.colgate.ca

Smiles of Bellevue
Tel: 425-455-2424
1418 112th Avenue NE, Suite 200
BellevueWA 98004
USA

Monday, 26 December 2011

Dental Health Care - Heart Disease and Gum Disease

Is There a Link Between Gum Disease and Heart Disease?
Overall the data indicates that chronic gum disease may contribute to the development of heart disease, the nation's leading cause of death in both men and women.

How does this happen? Gum disease is a bacterial infection that can affect conditions outside your mouth. In heart disease, one theory is that gum disease can cause bacteria to enter the bloodstream where they attach to the fatty deposits in the heart blood vessels. This condition can cause blood clots and may lead to heart attacks.

If I Have Heart Disease, Are There Special Requirements to Maintain Proper Oral Health?
To maintain the best oral health, you should:
  • Establish and maintain a healthy mouth. This means brushing and flossing daily and visiting your dentist regularly.
  • Make sure your dentist knows you have a heart problem.
  • Carefully follow your physician's and dentist's instructions, and use prescription medications, such as antibiotics, as directed.
Am I at Risk if Dental Procedures are Performed?
If you have certain preexisting heart conditions, you may be at risk for developing bacterial endocarditis — an infection of the heart's inner lining or the valves. Anytime there is bleeding in the mouth, certain oral bacteria can enter the blood stream and may settle on abnormal heart valves or tissue weakened by an existing heart problem or heart condition. In these cases, the infection can damage or even destroy heart valves or tissue.

There are precautions you need to take if you have any of the following conditions:

  • Artificial (prosthetic) heart valves
  • A history of endocarditis
  • Congenital heart or heart valve defects
  • Heart valves damaged (scarred) by conditions such as rheumatic fever
  • Mitral valve prolapse with a murmur
  • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
Be sure to tell your dentist if you have a heart condition, and what, if any, medications you are taking for it. Your dentist will record important health information in your record and coordinate treatment with your physician.

Above article from www.colgate.ca

Smiles of Bellevue
Tel: 425-455-2424
1418 112th Avenue NE, Suite 200
BellevueWA 98004
USA

Saturday, 24 December 2011

Cosmetic Dentistry - Dental Bonding - Smile Makeovers

Improving My Smile with Dental Bonds

How Does Bonding Work?
Bonding uses composite resins or porcelain/composite veneers to cover the surface of stained teeth and give a nice, even appearance to broken or misshapen teeth. There are two basic bonding techniques:
  • Composite bonding
    First, the front of the tooth is slightly reduced to prevent the "new" tooth from being too bulky. Microscopic grooves are then etched into the tooth surface with a mild acid. A composite resin matched to the colour of the surrounding teeth is applied to the tooth, contoured into shape, set using a curing light, and finally smoothed and polished.
  • Veneer bonding
    A veneer is made to match the colour and shape of your tooth. Porcelain veneers are generally stronger, while composite veneers are less expensive. With porcelain veneers, the dentist takes an impression of the tooth and sends it to the dental lab for fabrication of the veneer, usually after the front of the tooth has been reduced. With either method, the tooth is prepared for bonding by roughening the front surface with mild etching solution. The veneer can then be bonded to your tooth using a dental bonding cement.
While more expensive, a porcelain veneer offers a better colour match to your surrounding teeth and typically lasts for five to 10 years.

Above article from: www.colgate.ca

Smiles of Bellevue
Tel: 425-455-2424
1418 112th Avenue NE, Suite 200
BellevueWA 98004
USA